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Posts tagged NASA

758 notes &

the-star-stuff:

Kepler’s Transiting Multiple-Planet Systems

This video provides an overhead view of the multi-planet star systems discovered by the Kepler mission. According to NASA, all the planets — with the exception of the ones labeled in grey — have been officially confirmed.

This video also serves as an good introduction to an exoplanet-hunting technique you may not be familiar with. First, check out the incredible variation in the planets’ orbital periods (how long it takes each planet to make one complete trip around its sun). Since Kepler detects candidate planets by measuring dips in detectable light as one passes in front of — or “transits” — a distant star, having more than one planet in any given star system can give rise to some pretty crazy measurements. 

Planetary Systems video by Dan Fabrycky via NASA

Filed under science space exoplanets kepler nasa astronomy astrophysics universe cosmos GIF planets

312 notes &

the-star-stuff:

All These Stars Will Explode Together Like a String of Firecrackers

This is one of the most impressive Hubble Space Telescope’s images. It shows a massive group of young stars called R136, in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our own Milky Way. But that’s not what makes them so special:

Many of the diamond-like icy blue stars are among the most massive stars known. Several of them are 100 times more massive than our sun. These hefty stars are destined to pop off, like a string of firecrackers, as supernovas in a few million years.

In a few million years, someone—perhaps a bunch of space cats—will witness what will become of the most amazing firework shows in the history of the Universe. [NASA]

the-star-stuff:

All These Stars Will Explode Together Like a String of Firecrackers

This is one of the most impressive Hubble Space Telescope’s images. It shows a massive group of young stars called R136, in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our own Milky Way. But that’s not what makes them so special:

Many of the diamond-like icy blue stars are among the most massive stars known. Several of them are 100 times more massive than our sun. These hefty stars are destined to pop off, like a string of firecrackers, as supernovas in a few million years.

In a few million years, someone—perhaps a bunch of space cats—will witness what will become of the most amazing firework shows in the history of the Universe. [NASA]

Filed under science space astronomy stars universe cosmos star formation NASA

33 notes &

the-star-stuff:

Hubble zooms in on double nucleus in Andromeda Galaxy

The double nucleus is actually an elliptical ring of old reddish stars in orbit around a black hole but more distant than the compact central cluster of blue stars.
This is a Hubble image of the 100-million-solar-mass black hole at the hub of the neighboring spiral galaxy M31, the Andromeda Galaxy. The compact cluster of blue stars is surrounded by the larger “double nucleus” of M31. The double nucleus is actually an elliptical ring of old reddish stars in orbit around the black hole but more distant than the blue stars.

 Credit: NASA/ESA/T. Lauer (National Optical Astronomy Observatory)

the-star-stuff:

Hubble zooms in on double nucleus in Andromeda Galaxy

The double nucleus is actually an elliptical ring of old reddish stars in orbit around a black hole but more distant than the compact central cluster of blue stars.

This is a Hubble image of the 100-million-solar-mass black hole at the hub of the neighboring spiral galaxy M31, the Andromeda Galaxy. The compact cluster of blue stars is surrounded by the larger “double nucleus” of M31. The double nucleus is actually an elliptical ring of old reddish stars in orbit around the black hole but more distant than the blue stars.

 Credit: NASA/ESA/T. Lauer (National Optical Astronomy Observatory)

Filed under science space astronomy andromeda galaxy hubble nasa nucleus esa

82 notes &

the-star-stuff:

Meet Iapetus, Saturn’s mysterious “yin-yang” moon
More than 60 moons are known to orbit Saturn, but few of them are as visually striking as Iapetus. Named formally after the Greek mythological Titan, Iapetus is sometimes referred to as the “painted,” or “yin-yang” moon, due to puzzling variations in its surface composition.
Photo by The Cassini Imaging Team, via NASA

That’s no- oh, wait, yeah it is.

the-star-stuff:

Meet Iapetus, Saturn’s mysterious “yin-yang” moon

More than 60 moons are known to orbit Saturn, but few of them are as visually striking as Iapetus. Named formally after the Greek mythological Titan, Iapetus is sometimes referred to as the “painted,” or “yin-yang” moon, due to puzzling variations in its surface composition.

Photo by The Cassini Imaging Team, via NASA

That’s no- oh, wait, yeah it is.

Filed under science space astronomy universe cosmos NASA cassini saturn

5,769 notes &

sirmitchell:

Astronauts on the International Space Station captured these views of the aurora australis (“southern lights”) and wildfires in Australia in mid-September 2011.

Holy SHIT, this is unreal. I’ve watched it multiple times and I am still having a hard time believing it’s real. Wow. 

Filed under science space nasa

2,815 notes &

thedailyfeed:

A NASA satellite the size of a bus will hit the Earth sometime this afternoon - and scientists have little to no idea where it will land. 

The latest projections last night were that the defunct NASA satellite would tumble to Earth from space sometime this afternoon, but because the satellite is free-falling, the space agency and the U.S. Air Force cannot make a precise prediction about when and where it will hit.
The 13,000-pound Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, or UARS, was about 115 miles above Earth yesterday. It had been slowly falling back to the planet since it completed its mission in 2005.
Measuring 35 feet long and 15 feet in diameter, the satellite was launched into orbit aboard the space shuttle Discovery in September 1991 to study ozone and other chemicals in the Earth’s atmosphere.

thedailyfeed:

A NASA satellite the size of a bus will hit the Earth sometime this afternoon - and scientists have little to no idea where it will land

The latest projections last night were that the defunct NASA satellite would tumble to Earth from space sometime this afternoon, but because the satellite is free-falling, the space agency and the U.S. Air Force cannot make a precise prediction about when and where it will hit.

The 13,000-pound Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, or UARS, was about 115 miles above Earth yesterday. It had been slowly falling back to the planet since it completed its mission in 2005.

Measuring 35 feet long and 15 feet in diameter, the satellite was launched into orbit aboard the space shuttle Discovery in September 1991 to study ozone and other chemicals in the Earth’s atmosphere.

(via thedailyfeed)

Filed under NASA News Space

163 notes &

ianbrooks:

Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, having just completed the major portion of his second extravehicular activity (EVA) period in three days, holds up a “for sale” sign. Astronaut Joseph P. ALlen IV, who also participated in the two EVA’s, is reflected in Gardner’s helmet visor. A portion of each of two recovered satellites is in the lower right corner, with Westar nearer Discovery’s aft.
Not a fake! But a real life, legit photobombing of the Earth.
(via: nasaimages)

ianbrooks:

Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, having just completed the major portion of his second extravehicular activity (EVA) period in three days, holds up a “for sale” sign. Astronaut Joseph P. ALlen IV, who also participated in the two EVA’s, is reflected in Gardner’s helmet visor. A portion of each of two recovered satellites is in the lower right corner, with Westar nearer Discovery’s aft.

Not a fake! But a real life, legit photobombing of the Earth.

(via: nasaimages)

Filed under space nasa astronaut for sale sign dale gardner earth

268 notes &

itsfullofstars:

Mission Specialist Bruce McCandless II, is seen further away from the confines and safety of the Space Shuttle Challenger than any previous astronaut has ever been from an orbiter in this February 12, 1984 photo.
Source: Reuters/NASA

itsfullofstars:

Mission Specialist Bruce McCandless II, is seen further away from the confines and safety of the Space Shuttle Challenger than any previous astronaut has ever been from an orbiter in this February 12, 1984 photo.

Source: Reuters/NASA

Filed under space history NASA science