Y.A.B.A.N

I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany.

Posts tagged Obama

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Stonekettle Station: Negotiating With Terrorists

It’s hate for hate’s sake, hate driven by unreasoned selfish fear and nothing more.

When these capering lunatics stand in front of the nation, the world, and without a single shred of decency, without the tiniest modicum of self-conscious shame, without any apparent awareness of their own boundless hypocrisy, and loudly protest the release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl from the clutches of our sworn enemies, I have to say no more.

Filed under obama hatred

19 notes &

The evolution of the Obama Administration’s health care plan confirmed, to me, that traditional liberalism of the kind that dominated mid-twentieth century America has been effectively marginalized. The obvious answer to our health care system was some kind of Medicare for everyone, a government-run system providing a genuine alternative to the private health care industry which, inevitably, tries to take as much money out of the economy as it can while providing a necessity. The original House bill—emerging from perhaps the most liberal House that I am ever going to see again in my lifetime—included such an option, but Joe Lieberman and Ben Nelson killed it in the Senate. Like liberal positions in foreign policy, genuine New Deal-type reforms in domestic policy get serious consideration only in Democratic primaries. After a Democrat is elected they become embarrassments that rarely if ever survive the legislative process—and so it was in this case.
Some thoughts on health care and the law (via azspot)

(via azspot)

Filed under healthcare aca obama liberals history

72 notes &

cognitivedissonance:

O_o

NO…FUCKING…WAY

Rick Santorum seems to catch himself right before calling President Barack Obama a nigger at about 15 seconds into the video. 

Glen Coco at Vice has the scoop:

This is presidential candidate Rick Santorum (holy shit does that look scary written down) delivering a speech in Janesville, Wisconsin a couple of days ago. And, as you can see in the above video, it seems like he might have been on the verge of calling Obama a “nigger”… Santorum’s rolling out the racist gaffes about once a quarter so far in 2012, after this slip of the tongue back in January. (He was actually saying “blah people”, guys! Duhhh.)

Wow. I’m really not sure how he could walk this back, but honestly, with today’s GOP migrating backwards in time, I’m not sure he needs to walk it back.

And that is so very depressing.

Filed under Rick Santorum N-word politics seriously?! Barack Obama Obama racism race bigotry Racist Republican Election 2012 conservative

136 notes &

cognitivedissonance:

History lesson time!

Today, the GOP is losing its collective shit over President Obama making a recess appointment to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. He chose former Ohio attorney general Richard Cordray. Cordray, besides being a five-time Jeopardy champ, took on Bank of America and AIG as Ohio’s attorney general, and was endorsed by Elizabeth Warren to lead the CFPB. The attorneys general of other states also support his nomination.
As with anything else Obama wishes to put forth (besides kicking the door open to indefinite detention of Americans), the GOP said no. Since July, Republicans in the Senate have refused to consider his nomination because they hate Dodd-Frank. Seriously.
But Obama kicked a hornet’s nest by appointing Cordray during the Senate’s recess that is not technically, actually a recess. By holding pro-forma sessions, Senate Republicans allege the Senate has not recessed, thereby circumventing the requirement that the Senate approve nominations by the president. A pro-forma session does not require the Senate to meet in any meaningful way - essentially, one senator can bang the gavel, call the Senate to order, and then declare it in recess.
Brian Beutler has an interesting take on why Obama chose to challenge this at Talking Points Memo:

It’s customary for Presidents to heed this defensive tactic. But there’s nothing that says they have to. And Obama concluded he could move ahead. According to the Wall Street Journal the administration’s own attorneys don’t think they do — the Senate’s “pro forma” sessions are meaningless and Obama retains the Constitutional right to recess appoint whomever he wants until session begins in earnest.
This creates a significant new precedent — a bold power play in the face of an unprecedented act of GOP obstruction, but also something to which Obama (and Democrats more generally) have been pretty averse. Given that aversion, it’s hard to figure why Obama would choose to create a new precedent rather than avail himself of an existing one — unless you imagine he’s daring the GOP to make a big stink about it, and thus loudly side with Wall Street against him and middle-class consumers. It’s a safe bet that’s part of his thinking.

Because of GOP obstructionism, Obama has made a paltry 28 recess appointments in his entire term. Compare that with President Ronald Reagan’s 240 recess appointments, President George H. W. Bush’s 77 recess appointments, President Bill Clinton’s 140 recess appointments, and George W. Bush’s 171 appointments. So recess appointments have been done.
Former legal advisers to President George W. Bush agree Obama is in the right, and wrote of pro-forma sessions in 2010:

“The Senate cannot constitutionally thwart the president’s recess appointment power through pro forma sessions. Historically, the recess appointments clause has been given a practical interpretation. As Alexander Hamilton wrote in Federalist No. 67, the clause enables the president to keep the government fully staffed when the Senate is not ‘in session for the appointment of officers.’
The Senate Judiciary Committee recognized that a “Recess of the Senate” occurs whenever the Senate is not sitting for the discharge of its functions and when it cannot ‘participate as a body in making appointments.’
This practice will inevitably become the standard operating procedure, and the recess appointment power could become a virtual dead letter - undermining what the Founders viewed as an essential tool for the effective functioning of our government.”


In summary, there’s nothing that says Obama can’t do it, and precedent appears to suggest he can make the appointment since the Senate cannot meet to confirm an appointment. He’s only made 28 appointments in recess. He appointed someone who was blocked from taking office for several months because Republicans want to eliminate the office he would assume. And yet, Mitch McConnell calls the president arrogant, and Judson Phillips of Tea Party Nation issues this (metaphorical) call to arms:

Obama is acting like a dictator because he is not getting his way. The danger for the country is that no one is standing up to him. The one thing we have always learned about dictators and bullies is that someone must stand up to them and must do it early. When people do not stand up to dictators they keep grabbing more and more power until it is too late and impossible to stand up to them.   We must stand up, while we still can.

No one is standing up to him?! Have you seen the gridlock in Washington DC? When the GOP demands something, Obama has bent over backwards time and time again to “negotiate” - invariably crumbling in the process. Debt ceiling and health care reform anyone? If Obama were a dictator, Cordray would have been appointed, we might have had a public option, he wouldn’t have cared what the GOP thought about the debt ceiling or tax cuts, etc…
Remember this whole repeal tax cuts for the rich thing that happened this summer? You know, that didn’t happen? I’ll break it down for you:

If Obama’s a dictator, then what the hell does that make the reactionaries in the GOP?

cognitivedissonance:

History lesson time!

Today, the GOP is losing its collective shit over President Obama making a recess appointment to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. He chose former Ohio attorney general Richard Cordray. Cordray, besides being a five-time Jeopardy champ, took on Bank of America and AIG as Ohio’s attorney general, and was endorsed by Elizabeth Warren to lead the CFPB. The attorneys general of other states also support his nomination.

As with anything else Obama wishes to put forth (besides kicking the door open to indefinite detention of Americans), the GOP said no. Since July, Republicans in the Senate have refused to consider his nomination because they hate Dodd-Frank. Seriously.

But Obama kicked a hornet’s nest by appointing Cordray during the Senate’s recess that is not technically, actually a recess. By holding pro-forma sessions, Senate Republicans allege the Senate has not recessed, thereby circumventing the requirement that the Senate approve nominations by the president. A pro-forma session does not require the Senate to meet in any meaningful way - essentially, one senator can bang the gavel, call the Senate to order, and then declare it in recess.

Brian Beutler has an interesting take on why Obama chose to challenge this at Talking Points Memo:

It’s customary for Presidents to heed this defensive tactic. But there’s nothing that says they have to. And Obama concluded he could move ahead. According to the Wall Street Journal the administration’s own attorneys don’t think they do — the Senate’s “pro forma” sessions are meaningless and Obama retains the Constitutional right to recess appoint whomever he wants until session begins in earnest.

This creates a significant new precedent — a bold power play in the face of an unprecedented act of GOP obstruction, but also something to which Obama (and Democrats more generally) have been pretty averse. Given that aversion, it’s hard to figure why Obama would choose to create a new precedent rather than avail himself of an existing one — unless you imagine he’s daring the GOP to make a big stink about it, and thus loudly side with Wall Street against him and middle-class consumers. It’s a safe bet that’s part of his thinking.

Because of GOP obstructionism, Obama has made a paltry 28 recess appointments in his entire term. Compare that with President Ronald Reagan’s 240 recess appointments, President George H. W. Bush’s 77 recess appointments, President Bill Clinton’s 140 recess appointments, and George W. Bush’s 171 appointments. So recess appointments have been done.

Former legal advisers to President George W. Bush agree Obama is in the right, and wrote of pro-forma sessions in 2010:

“The Senate cannot constitutionally thwart the president’s recess appointment power through pro forma sessions. Historically, the recess appointments clause has been given a practical interpretation. As Alexander Hamilton wrote in Federalist No. 67, the clause enables the president to keep the government fully staffed when the Senate is not ‘in session for the appointment of officers.’

The Senate Judiciary Committee recognized that a “Recess of the Senate” occurs whenever the Senate is not sitting for the discharge of its functions and when it cannot ‘participate as a body in making appointments.’

This practice will inevitably become the standard operating procedure, and the recess appointment power could become a virtual dead letter - undermining what the Founders viewed as an essential tool for the effective functioning of our government.”

In summary, there’s nothing that says Obama can’t do it, and precedent appears to suggest he can make the appointment since the Senate cannot meet to confirm an appointment. He’s only made 28 appointments in recess. He appointed someone who was blocked from taking office for several months because Republicans want to eliminate the office he would assume. And yet, Mitch McConnell calls the president arrogant, and Judson Phillips of Tea Party Nation issues this (metaphorical) call to arms:

Obama is acting like a dictator because he is not getting his way. The danger for the country is that no one is standing up to him. The one thing we have always learned about dictators and bullies is that someone must stand up to them and must do it early. When people do not stand up to dictators they keep grabbing more and more power until it is too late and impossible to stand up to them. We must stand up, while we still can.

No one is standing up to him?! Have you seen the gridlock in Washington DC? When the GOP demands something, Obama has bent over backwards time and time again to “negotiate” - invariably crumbling in the process. Debt ceiling and health care reform anyone? If Obama were a dictator, Cordray would have been appointed, we might have had a public option, he wouldn’t have cared what the GOP thought about the debt ceiling or tax cuts, etc…

Remember this whole repeal tax cuts for the rich thing that happened this summer? You know, that didn’t happen? I’ll break it down for you:

If Obama’s a dictator, then what the hell does that make the reactionaries in the GOP?

Filed under Richard Cordray Obama recess Politics recess appointment GOP Republican Republicans Mitch McConnell Tea Party GOP US Senate conservative CFPB Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

887 notes &

‘See, it was our job to start (the Iraq War) badly. We did that. We were fucking idiots. His job is to finish it well.’ …You know, for the guys who bear a good amount of responsibility for getting us into this clusterfuck to go all Statler and Waldorf on the exit… It’s like the captain of the Exxon Valdez standing around Alaska, saying ‘Hey, you’re scrubbin’ the oil off those birds all wrong. You should be using steel wool and Ajax. I can’t believe you jackoffs are screwing up the environment like this.’

For God’s sake, in like three days, Obama’s taken us down from three wars to one. (Beat.) Is that what’s going on here? Are America’s hawks having empty nest syndrome?

A bewildered JON STEWART, on Republican critics such as John McCain, Michele Bachmann and Lindsey Graham being critical of president Obama’s recent foreign policy triumphs in Libya and Iraq, on The Daily Show.

Yep.

(via inothernews)

(via squeetothegee-deactivated201111)

Filed under republicans gop politics iraq libya obama news

524 notes &

bluntlyblue:

stfuracists:

Obama was born in America.
Anyone saying otherwise is racist.
Why is it racist? Because the implications are:
American = white
not white = not American
a person of color could only be elected President through fraud
Birthers and racists need to STFU.
You would think this is a re-blog from one of last year’s posts.
Nope. Today is Sunday, October 23, 2011, and Rick Perry is still challenging the legitimacy of the birth certificate.
(image via Gawker)

what a pig

bluntlyblue:

stfuracists:

Obama was born in America.

Anyone saying otherwise is racist.

Why is it racist? Because the implications are:

  • American = white
  • not white = not American
  • a person of color could only be elected President through fraud

Birthers and racists need to STFU.

You would think this is a re-blog from one of last year’s posts.

Nope. Today is Sunday, October 23, 2011, and Rick Perry is still challenging the legitimacy of the birth certificate.

(image via Gawker)

what a pig

(via squeetothegee-deactivated201111)

Filed under race racism racist normative whiteness obama Birthers

729 notes &

First of all, I did get elected President, so not everybody hates me…. But what you know is true is, if you’re watching TV lately, it seems like everybody’s just getting mad all the time. You know, I think you’ve gotta take it with a grain of salt. Some of it is just what’s called politics, where once one party wins, the other party kinda feels like it needs to poke you a little bit to keep you on your toes.

And so you shouldn’t take it too seriously. And then sometimes — as I’ve said before, people — I think they’re worried about their own lives. A lot of people are losing their jobs right now; a lot of people are losing their healthcare, or they’ve lost their homes to foreclosure. And they’re feeling frustrated. And when you’re President of the United States, you’ve gotta deal with all of that.

…And, you know, you get some of the credit when things go good. When things are going tough, you know, you’re going to get some of the blame, and that’s part of the job. But I’m a pretty tough guy. (To child.) Are you a tough guy? You look like you’re pretty tough. And so, you’ve just gotta keep on going when folks are criticizing you… as long as you know you’re doing it for other people.

President BARACK OBAMA, responding to a 4th-grade student asking “Why do people hate you?” during a televised town hall meeting in New Orleans, LA.

A child calls it hate.  The Republican and Tea Parties call it fair game.

Despite what the child sees.

(h/t superswagittarius)

(Source: inothernews)

Filed under obama politics

1,395 notes &

Statement by the President on the Passing of Steve Jobs

shortformblog:

Michelle and I are saddened to learn of the passing of Steve Jobs. Steve was among the greatest of American innovators - brave enough to think differently, bold enough to believe he could change the world, and talented enough to do it.

By building one of the planet’s most successful companies from his garage, he exemplified the spirit of American ingenuity. By making computers personal and putting the internet in our pockets, he made the information revolution not only accessible, but intuitive and fun. And by turning his talents to storytelling, he has brought joy to millions of children and grownups alike. Steve was fond of saying that he lived every day like it was his last. Because he did, he transformed our lives, redefined entire industries, and achieved one of the rarest feats in human history: he changed the way each of us sees the world.

The world has lost a visionary. And there may be no greater tribute to Steve’s success than the fact that much of the world learned of his passing on a device he invented. Michelle and I send our thoughts and prayers to Steve’s wife Laurene, his family, and all those who loved him.

Bolded our favorite line from this. (Thanks Matt for sending this along)

(via ro-s-a-spark-s)

Filed under steve jobs apple jobs white house obama barack obama michelle obama

86 notes &

President Obama will unveil a deficit-reduction plan on Monday that uses entitlement cuts, tax increases and war savings to reduce government spending by more than $3 trillion over the next 10 years, administration officials said.

The plan, which Mr. Obama will lay out Monday morning at the White House, is the administration’s opening move in sweeping negotiations on deficit reduction to be taken up by a joint House-Senate committee over the next two months. If a deal is not struck by Dec. 23, cuts could take effect automatically across government agencies.

Mr. Obama will call for $1.5 trillion in tax increases, primarily on the wealthy, through a combination of closing loopholes and limiting the amount that high earners can deduct. The proposal also includes $580 billion in adjustments to health and entitlement programs, including $248 billion to Medicare and $72 billion to Medicaid. Administration officials said that the Medicare cuts would not come from an increase in the Medicare eligibility age.

Senior administration officials who briefed reporters on some of the details of Mr. Obama’s proposal said that the plan also counts a savings of $1.1 trillion from the ending of the American combat mission in Iraq and the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan.

In laying out his proposal, aides said, Mr. Obama will expressly promise to veto any legislation that seeks to cut the deficit through spending cuts alone and does not include revenue increases in the form of tax increases on the wealthy.

The New York Times, “Obama to Offer Plan to Cut Deficit by Over $3 Trillion.”

Go get ‘em, Mr. President.  But know that we’re holding you to that last promise.

(via inothernews)

Filed under obama deficit politics news