Y.A.B.A.N

I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany.

Posts tagged planets

758 notes &

the-star-stuff:

Kepler’s Transiting Multiple-Planet Systems

This video provides an overhead view of the multi-planet star systems discovered by the Kepler mission. According to NASA, all the planets — with the exception of the ones labeled in grey — have been officially confirmed.

This video also serves as an good introduction to an exoplanet-hunting technique you may not be familiar with. First, check out the incredible variation in the planets’ orbital periods (how long it takes each planet to make one complete trip around its sun). Since Kepler detects candidate planets by measuring dips in detectable light as one passes in front of — or “transits” — a distant star, having more than one planet in any given star system can give rise to some pretty crazy measurements. 

Planetary Systems video by Dan Fabrycky via NASA

Filed under science space exoplanets kepler nasa astronomy astrophysics universe cosmos GIF planets

140 notes &

the-star-stuff:

Hypervelocity planets are zooming out of our galaxy at warp speed

The wildest ride in the galaxy is found on hypervelocity planets. These worlds got too close to the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy, and have been flung away at a twentieth of the speed of light.
While rogue planets are common enough, these hypervelocity planets represent a much rarer case and can only be formed by a star system - specifically, a double star system - coming into contact with Sagittarius-A*, our galaxy’s central supermassive black hole. Previous research has indicated that when a binary star system gets too close to Sagittarius-A*, it’s possible the system to be ripped apart, with one star entering orbit around the black hole while the other is ejected at enormous speeds.
[continue reading…]
Via Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Artist’s conception by David A. Aguilar (CfA).

the-star-stuff:

Hypervelocity planets are zooming out of our galaxy at warp speed

The wildest ride in the galaxy is found on hypervelocity planets. These worlds got too close to the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy, and have been flung away at a twentieth of the speed of light.

While rogue planets are common enough, these hypervelocity planets represent a much rarer case and can only be formed by a star system - specifically, a double star system - coming into contact with Sagittarius-A*, our galaxy’s central supermassive black hole. Previous research has indicated that when a binary star system gets too close to Sagittarius-A*, it’s possible the system to be ripped apart, with one star entering orbit around the black hole while the other is ejected at enormous speeds.

[continue reading…]

Via Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Artist’s conception by David A. Aguilar (CfA).

Filed under science astronomy space planet planets hypervelocity planets rogue planets runaway planets star black hole

207 notes &

inothernews:

E-RING / F-STOP   The  robotic Cassini spacecraft, currently in orbit above  Saturn, drifted in giant planet’s  shadow for about 12 hours in 2006 and and captured this incredible image, seen in exaggerated colors.  First, the  night side of Saturn is seen to be partly lit by light reflected from its own  majestic ring system.   Next, the rings themselves appear dark when  silhouetted against Saturn,  but quite bright when viewed away from Saturn, slightly scattering sunlight — in fact, new rings were discovered, including the planet’s E ring, created by the newly discovered  ice-fountains of the moon  Enceladus and the outermost ring visible above.    Far in the  distance,  at the left, just above the bright main rings, is the almost ignorable  pale blue dot of Earth. (Photo: Cassini Imagining Team via NASA)

inothernews:

E-RING / F-STOP   The robotic Cassini spacecraft, currently in orbit above Saturn, drifted in giant planet’s shadow for about 12 hours in 2006 and and captured this incredible image, seen in exaggerated colors.  First, the night side of Saturn is seen to be partly lit by light reflected from its own majestic ring system. Next, the rings themselves appear dark when silhouetted against Saturn, but quite bright when viewed away from Saturn, slightly scattering sunlight — in fact, new rings were discovered, including the planet’s E ring, created by the newly discovered ice-fountains of the moon Enceladus and the outermost ring visible above. Far in the distance, at the left, just above the bright main rings, is the almost ignorable pale blue dot of Earth. (Photo: Cassini Imagining Team via NASA)

Filed under space saturn cassini planets science